Review Sheet Exercise 13 Articulations And Body Movements Pdf

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Ligament is a dense connective tissue made out of fasica that connects one bone to another.

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11.4 Identify the skeletal muscles and give their origins, insertions, actions and innervations

Synovial joints allow the body a tremendous range of movements. Each movement at a synovial joint results from the contraction or relaxation of the muscles that are attached to the bones on either side of the articulation. The type of movement that can be produced at a synovial joint is determined by its structural type. While the ball-and-socket joint gives the greatest range of movement at an individual joint, in other regions of the body, several joints may work together to produce a particular movement.

Overall, each type of synovial joint is necessary to provide the body with its great flexibility and mobility.

There are many types of movement that can occur at synovial joints Table 9. Movement types are generally paired, with one being the opposite of the other. Body movements are always described in relation to the anatomical position of the body: upright stance, with upper limbs to the side of body and palms facing forward.

Refer to Figure 9. Watch this video to learn about anatomical motions. What motions involve increasing or decreasing the angle of the foot at the ankle? Flexion and extension are typically movements that take place within the sagittal plane and involve anterior or posterior movements of the neck, trunk, or limbs. For the vertebral column, flexion anterior flexion is an anterior forward bending of the neck or trunk, while extension involves a posterior-directed motion, such as straightening from a flexed position or bending backward.

Lateral flexion of the vertebral column occurs in the coronal plane and is defined as the bending of the neck or trunk toward the right or left side.. These movements of the vertebral column involve both the symphysis joint formed by each intervertebral disc, as well as the plane type of synovial joint formed between the inferior articular processes of one vertebra and the superior articular processes of the next lower vertebra.

In the limbs, flexion decreases the angle between the bones bending of the joint , while extension increases the angle and straightens the joint. For the upper limb, all anterior-going motions are flexion and all posterior-going motions are extension. These include anterior-posterior movements of the arm at the shoulder, the forearm at the elbow, the hand at the wrist, and the fingers at the metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joints. For the thumb, extension moves the thumb away from the palm of the hand, within the same plane as the palm, while flexion brings the thumb back against the index finger or into the palm.

These motions take place at the first carpometacarpal joint. In the lower limb, bringing the thigh forward and upward is flexion at the hip joint, while any posterior-going motion of the thigh is extension. Note that extension of the thigh beyond the anatomical standing position is greatly limited by the ligaments that support the hip joint. Knee flexion is the bending of the knee to bring the foot toward the posterior thigh, and extension is the straightening of the knee.

Flexion and extension movements are seen at the hinge, condyloid, saddle, and ball-and-socket joints of the limbs see Figure 9. Hyperextension is the abnormal or excessive extension of a joint beyond its normal range of motion, thus resulting in injury. Similarly, hyperflexion is excessive flexion at a joint. Hyperextension injuries are common at hinge joints such as the knee or elbow.

Abduction and adduction motions occur within the coronal plane and involve medial-lateral motions of the limbs, fingers, toes, or thumb. Abduction moves the limb laterally away from the midline of the body, while adduction is the opposing movement that brings the limb toward the body or across the midline. For example, abduction is raising the arm at the shoulder joint, moving it laterally away from the body, while adduction brings the arm down to the side of the body.

Similarly, abduction and adduction at the wrist moves the hand away from or toward the midline of the body. Spreading the fingers or toes apart is also abduction, while bringing the fingers or toes together is adduction. Adduction moves the thumb back to the anatomical position, next to the index finger. Abduction and adduction movements are seen at condyloid, saddle, and ball-and-socket joints see Figure 9.

Circumduction is the movement of a body region in a circular manner, in which one end of the body region being moved stays relatively stationary while the other end describes a circle. It involves the sequential combination of flexion, adduction, extension, and abduction at a joint.

This type of motion is found at biaxial condyloid and saddle joints, and at multiaxial ball-and-sockets joints see Figure 9. Rotation can occur within the vertebral column, at a pivot joint, or at a ball-and-socket joint. Rotation of the neck or body is the twisting movement produced by the summation of the small rotational movements available between adjacent vertebrae.

At a pivot joint, one bone rotates in relation to another bone. This is a uniaxial joint, and thus rotation is the only motion allowed at a pivot joint.

For example, at the atlantoaxial joint, the first cervical C1 vertebra atlas rotates around the dens, the upward projection from the second cervical C2 vertebra axis. This joint allows for the radius to rotate along its length during pronation and supination movements of the forearm.

Rotation can also occur at the ball-and-socket joints of the shoulder and hip. Here, the humerus and femur rotate around their long axis, which moves the anterior surface of the arm or thigh either toward or away from the midline of the body.

Movement that brings the anterior surface of the limb toward the midline of the body is called medial internal rotation. Conversely, rotation of the limb so that the anterior surface moves away from the midline is lateral external rotation see Figure 9. Be sure to distinguish medial and lateral rotation, which can only occur at the multiaxial shoulder and hip joints, from circumduction, which can occur at either biaxial or multiaxial joints. Supination and pronation are movements of the forearm.

In the anatomical position, the upper limb is held next to the body with the palm facing forward. This is the supinated position of the forearm. In this position, the radius and ulna are parallel to each other.

When the palm of the hand faces backward, the forearm is in the pronated position , and the radius and ulna form an X-shape. Supination and pronation are the movements of the forearm that go between these two positions. Pronation is the motion that moves the forearm from the supinated anatomical position to the pronated palm backward position. This motion is produced by rotation of the radius at the proximal radioulnar joint, accompanied by movement of the radius at the distal radioulnar joint.

The proximal radioulnar joint is a pivot joint that allows for rotation of the head of the radius. Because of the slight curvature of the shaft of the radius, this rotation causes the distal end of the radius to cross over the distal ulna at the distal radioulnar joint.

This crossing over brings the radius and ulna into an X-shape position. Supination is the opposite motion, in which rotation of the radius returns the bones to their parallel positions and moves the palm to the anterior facing supinated position. It helps to remember that supination is the motion you use when scooping up soup with a spoon see Figure 9. Dorsiflexion and plantar flexion are movements at the ankle joint, which is a hinge joint.

Lifting the front of the foot, so that the top of the foot moves toward the anterior leg is dorsiflexion, while lifting the heel of the foot from the ground or pointing the toes downward is plantar flexion.

These are the only movements available at the ankle joint see Figure 9. Inversion and eversion are complex movements that involve the multiple plane joints among the tarsal bones of the posterior foot intertarsal joints and thus are not motions that take place at the ankle joint. Inversion is the turning of the foot to angle the bottom of the foot toward the midline, while eversion turns the bottom of the foot away from the midline. The foot has a greater range of inversion than eversion motion.

These are important motions that help to stabilize the foot when walking or running on an uneven surface and aid in the quick side-to-side changes in direction used during active sports such as basketball, racquetball, or soccer see Figure 9. Protraction and retraction are anterior-posterior movements of the scapula or mandible. Protraction of the scapula occurs when the shoulder is moved forward, as when pushing against something or throwing a ball.

Retraction is the opposite motion, with the scapula being pulled posteriorly and medially, toward the vertebral column. For the mandible, protraction occurs when the lower jaw is pushed forward, to stick out the chin, while retraction pulls the lower jaw backward. See Figure 9. Depression and elevation are downward and upward movements of the scapula or mandible. The upward movement of the scapula and shoulder is elevation, while a downward movement is depression.

These movements are used to shrug your shoulders. Similarly, elevation of the mandible is the upward movement of the lower jaw used to close the mouth or bite on something, and depression is the downward movement that produces opening of the mouth see Figure 9.

Excursion is the side to side movement of the mandible. Lateral excursion moves the mandible away from the midline, toward either the right or left side. Medial excursion returns the mandible to its resting position at the midline. Superior and inferior rotation are movements of the scapula and are defined by the direction of movement of the glenoid cavity.

These motions involve rotation of the scapula around a point inferior to the scapular spine and are produced by combinations of muscles acting on the scapula. During superior rotation , the glenoid cavity moves upward as the medial end of the scapular spine moves downward. This is a very important motion that contributes to upper limb abduction. Without superior rotation of the scapula, the greater tubercle of the humerus would hit the acromion of the scapula, thus preventing any abduction of the arm above shoulder height.

Superior rotation of the scapula is thus required for full abduction of the upper limb. Superior rotation is also used without arm abduction when carrying a heavy load with your hand or on your shoulder. You can feel this rotation when you pick up a load, such as a heavy book bag and carry it on only one shoulder.

To increase its weight-bearing support for the bag, the shoulder lifts as the scapula superiorly rotates. Inferior rotation occurs during limb adduction and involves the downward motion of the glenoid cavity with upward movement of the medial end of the scapular spine.

Opposition is the thumb movement that brings the tip of the thumb in contact with the tip of a finger. This movement is produced at the first carpometacarpal joint, which is a saddle joint formed between the trapezium carpal bone and the first metacarpal bone. Thumb opposition is produced by a combination of flexion and abduction of the thumb at this joint. Returning the thumb to its anatomical position next to the index finger is called reposition see Figure 9.

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Review Sheet Exercise 13 Articulations And Body Movements

By the end of this section, you will be able to identify the following muscles and give their origins, insertions, actions and innervations:. The skeletal muscles are divided into axial muscles of the trunk and head and appendicular muscles of the arms and legs categories. This system reflects the bones of the skeleton system, which are also arranged in this manner. Some of the axial muscles may seem to blur the boundaries because they cross over to the appendicular skeleton. The first grouping of the axial muscles you will review includes the muscles of the head and neck, then you will review the muscles of the vertebral column, and finally you will review the oblique and rectus muscles. The muscles of facial expression originate from the surface of the skull or the fascia connective tissue of the face. The insertions of these muscles have fibers intertwined with connective tissue and the dermis of the skin.

But watch him. To have worked for years, to have planned and plotted, and then to get some fumbling purblind idiot messing across your course. Every conceivable sort of silly creature that has ever been created has been sent to cross me. Quality Control Manual For Wall Contractors Following the plan proposed by Cyrus Harding, the space was to be divided into five compartments looking out on the sea; to the right, an entry with a door, which would meet the ladder; then a kitchen, thirty feet long; a dining-room, measuring forty feet; a sleeping-room, of equal size; and lastly, a "Visitor's room," petitioned for by Pencroft, and which was next to the great hall. These rooms, or rather this suite of rooms, would not occupy all the depth of the cave. There would be also a corridor and a storehouse, in which their tools, provisions, and stores would be kept.


Download File PDF Articulations And Body Movements Review Sheet Answers exercise 11 review sheet: Articulations an body movements Chapter


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Exercise 11: Review Sheet: Articulations and Body Movements

What structures make up the back? What causes lower back pain? What are the risk factors for developing low back pain?

2 Comments

  1. Ernest B. 19.05.2021 at 22:55

    exercise. Articulations and. Body Movements. Review Sheet Fibrous, Cartilaginous, and Synovial Joints. 1. Use key responses to identify the joint.

  2. Zara G. 23.05.2021 at 10:32

    Identify the major groups of bone which belong to the axial skeleton and to the appendicular skeleton.