Language Programs And Policies In Multilingual Societies Pdf Syllabus

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The processes of globalization are highly complex and influence the multi-layered structures of societies: economic, socio-cultural, political, linguistic and education aspects among others. The roles of language policy and language practice and use in education have been regarded to influence the efficacy of teaching and learning in the school setting.

Attendance

Language and Public Policy. Why does language become a policy issue? How do societies allocate resources to promote, protect, or silence a particular language?

These questions are at the heart of intense conflict around the globe. In this course you will learn about the role that language plays in shaping both domestic and international politics, and how politics in turn shapes the actual language use of individual members of society. We will pay particular attention to how linguistically homogeneous societies accommodate linguistic minorities and how multilingual societies cope with diverse languages. We will also examine the economic and political implications that policies about language have for the political and cultural viability of their speakers.

You should be able to apply the concepts and theories learned in class to produce clear policy analyses. Finally, you should improve your ability to do independent research.

Class time will be substantially devoted to discussion, with only limited lecturing. I plan to provide discussion questions before each class to guide you through the reading these questions will be linked to the syllabus from the course web page. The course requirements are active participation in discussion, two short research essays, and a substantial independent research paper. The schedule and class procedures are subject to change in the event of extenuating circumstances and to accommodate the interests and pace of the class.

It is important that you keep up with the readings and complete them before the class session where they will be discussed. Lectures and discussion will not repeat what is in the reading; they will build off them and include new information. I reserve the right to change the assigned readings for a class session, and will make any new readings available to you a week before the class session where they will be discussed.

You can purchase a reader containing all of the assigned readings for the class at Wheelock Books. Almost all of the readings are journal articles or chapters from books; some of these books are in the library and the rest are in my office and available for you to borrow.

I encourage you to use these as a starting point for your research essays and papers. Do not cheat, do not plagiarize; follow the honor code and your own internal moral compass. Do not be afraid to talk to me if you have any questions about this issue. Because you will be writing research papers, we will go over these issues in some detail during class time as well. These focus on plagiarism and on academic dishonesty in the taking of examinations, the writing of papers, the use of the same work in more than one course, and unauthorized collaboration.

Any form of plagiarism violates the Academic Honor Principle. With specific regard to papers, a simple rule dictates when it is necessary to acknowledge sources. If a student obtains information or ideas from an outside source, that source must be acknowledged. Another rule to follow is that any direct quotations must be placed in quotation marks, and the source immediately cited.

Also, contact the Academic Skills Center, , asc dartmouth. Introduction to issues in language policy. Identity and nationalism. Human rights and official languages. Language development and planning.

Language shifts, language death. AAVE and bilingual education. Institutional language reform movements. January 6: Introduction to the course. January 8: Introduction to language policy issues.

January Language and identity. This session will introduce you to the library and its resources, and review how to do research for the research essays and final paper evaluating sources, conducting interviews, etc. January Language and nationalism.

January Language and human rights. January Choosing an official language. Reagan, T. Mazrui, Alamin M. January Overview of language planning, language development. February 3: Language planning in India and Southeast Asia.

February 5: Language planning in Canada. February Overview of language shift and language death. Hornberger , Nancy H. This article is available online through the Dartmouth library. February Indigenous language death in the Americas.

Zepeda, Ofelia and Jane H. February Linguistic diversity in the United States. Available at:. Review material on the websites of these three organizations:. February Bilingual education in the United States. March 4: Reforming institutional language: risk communication. March 9: The challenges of globalization for language policy. The Cultural Legacy. March Ager, Dennis. Motivation in Language Planning and Language Policy.

Baugh, John. Barbour, Stephen and Cathie Carmichael, eds. Language and Nationalism in Europe. Churchill, Stacy. Ottawa: Canadian Heritage. Cooper, Robert L. Language Planning and Social Change. Crystal, David. English as a Global Language. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Errington, J. Fishman, Joshua A. Handbook of Language and Ethnicity. Grenoble, Lenore and Lindsey Whaley, eds. Grenoble, Lenore. Language Policy in the Soviet Union. Kibbee, Douglas A. Language Legislation and Linguistic Rights.

Lundgren, Regina E and Andrea H. Columbus, OH: Battelle Press. Mazrui, Ali A. Chicago, Ill: University of Chicago Press. Mesthrie, Rajend, ed. Language in South Africa. National Research Council. Improving Risk Communication. Washington D. Nettle, Daniel and Suzanne Romaine. Rickford, John. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers. Robins, R. Uhlenbeck, eds.

Endangered Languages. New York, NY: St. Romaine, Suzanne. Language in Society: An Introduction to Sociolinguistics. Schiffman, Harold F.

language programs and policies in multilingual societies syllabus ched

Language and Public Policy. Why does language become a policy issue? How do societies allocate resources to promote, protect, or silence a particular language? These questions are at the heart of intense conflict around the globe. In this course you will learn about the role that language plays in shaping both domestic and international politics, and how politics in turn shapes the actual language use of individual members of society. We will pay particular attention to how linguistically homogeneous societies accommodate linguistic minorities and how multilingual societies cope with diverse languages. We will also examine the economic and political implications that policies about language have for the political and cultural viability of their speakers.

Metrics details. Language- in- education policy in Ghana has been in a flux since British colonial rule but particularly so after independence. A close examination of post independence language in education policies shows these fluctuating policies have moved from one form of bilingual education policy to another. In this article, I present a brief historical account of the developments of language policy in education in Ghana since independence and argue that while the flux may have been caused in part by instability in government leadership, it may have also occurred as a result of possible tensions between the set objectives and the implementation of such policies, i. According to Freeland [ ], p. This seems to have been the framework within which early language in education policies operated. They were designed to assimilate minorities, indigenous or immigrant groups into societies that were imagined to be monolingual or mono-cultural.

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COURSE OUTLINE in Language Programs and Policies in Multilingual Societies. COURSE TITLE.: Language Programs and Policies in Multilingual. Societies.


The Current Trends in Language Policies for Multilingualism

It's not a secret that policies are subject to interpretation. The workshop will explore the role of policy and practice at both the family and the community level. Content may be subject to copyright. When it comes to multilingual societies, decisions also need to be made concerning how many languages the society will support, how many languages members of the society are expected to learn, and so on. UNIT 2.

Tarlac State University commits to promote and sustain the offering of quality and programs in higher and advanced education ensuring equitable access to education for people empowerment, professional development, and global competitiveness. Provide high quality instruction trough qualified, competent and adequately trained faculty members and support staff. Be a premier research institution by enhancing research undertakings in the fields of technology and sciences and strengthening collaboration with local and international institutions. Be a champion in community development by strengthening partnership with public and private organizations and individuals. Form No.

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